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Brighten Your Spring Giveaways — Logitech

April 24th, 2015 by

Logitech-blog

NextStepU loves to share products and companies with you that we think are simply amazing. After all, we know you need gear for college and if you are working, sometimes you want to splurge that hard-earned salary on something fun.

We also know cash is tight, so we love to give things away! For the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing with you products we think you’ll love that are sure to BRIGHTEN YOUR DAY!

Today we share with you a a tiny gift, but one sure to put a smile on your face. Our friends at Logitech are giving away one (1) Logitech bemo social video camera ($129 value). The winner will be able to choose which color bemo they want (Manhattan Black, Mykonos Blue or Moroccan Red).

With bemo, you can turn your adventures and everyday moments into movies, and share them on the go. bemo fits in the palm of your hand and captures high-quality videos with just one touch. It’s simple and portable, so you can easily take it with you wherever you go. It’s the perfect way for any student to document adventures and stay in touch with friends and family.

To enter to win the one bemo Logitech is giving away, all you have to do it fill out the Rafflecopter app below. Each action you take in the app gets you one more entry.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

No purchase necessary. Enter the Brighten Your Spring: Logitech Giveaway before 11:59 p.m. (ET) on 4/30/15. One winner will be chosen shortly afterward and announced the week of 5/4/15. The winner must respond to the email he or she receives in order to claim his or her prize. Any prize winner not responding by 6/4/15 will forfeit his/her prize. Entries will only be accepted through the Rafflecopter application and before the deadline date. 

 

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Scholarships — American Red Cross

April 23rd, 2015 by

Scholarships-header-2

NextStepU is happy to help guide you toward scholarships and opportunities to earn money for college. Here is a new scholarship we found for you!

Scholarship: Leaders Save Lives Scholarship Program

Amount:  $1,000, $1,500 or $2,500 scholarships are available

Description: Leaders Save Lives is a scholarship opportunity for high school and college students. Students will gain a meaningful leadership and community service experience. In addition, students may become eligible to win a college scholarship and earn a gift card from giftcertificates.com.

Requirements: Students should submit a registration form and be between the ages of 16 and 24 to participate. Students will be contacted by a local American Red Cross representative to discuss their potential as a Leaders Save Lives blood drive coordinator.

Students will work hand-in-hand with an American Red Cross representative as they lead a team of recruiters in hosting a lifesaving blood drive. A successful blood drive can help ensure a stable blood supply.

Deadline: August 31, 2015

For more information:  Visit the Leaders Save Lives Scholarship Program website.

Best of luck to those who apply!

> Want to continue your search? Take a look at NextStepU’s database of more than 2 million scholarships after you register at NextStepU.com.

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Course registration…or the Hunger Games?

April 22nd, 2015 by

iStock_000005413098SmallIn the beginning of April, I was trying to do work when I got an email saying the course offerings for fall 2015 were out. At that moment, my productivity went right down the drain. First, I’m shocked because it feels like this semester just started. It seems like I just had to go through the awkward introductions and yet it’s already almost coming to an end. Second, I had been waiting for weeks to see what was going to be offered, so I jumped right on.

Registration this time is a little bittersweet for me. I’ll finally get to go early on the first day, guaranteeing that I’ll get the classes needed. But at the same time, I already have 114 credits which means I’ll be graduating in December. So these last three classes I’m about to sign up for are my last. I’ll never experience the stress and anxiety of planning course schedules and signing in to register again.

When the courses come out, everyone worries about which class they’re going to take instead of doing the work they have for the classes they’re currently taking. Try not to do this because you’re going to add even more stress to your plate. As a veteran of class registration, I’ve learned a few things along the way to ensure you get what you want — or at least something you need.

Here are some other tips I’ve learned throughout the years when it comes to course registration:

  • Make more than one potential schedule and have backup classes. Looking for classes while you’re trying to register is not going to help you any. If you get closed out of a class, make sure you have other ones you can take.

  • Meet with your advisor. Most advisors, or at least at Fisher, require you to meet with them in order to get the information you need to register. You could get penalized by being locked out of registration if you don’t do this! However, even if this isn’t the case for your school, still meet with him or her so you can make sure you have what you need and are on track to graduate on time.

  • If you need special permission from an instructor to get into a class, set this up ahead of time so you will be able to get in when it’s your time. For example, if there’s a class you want to take but you don’t meet every requirement, see what you can do to get around that. If that requires a professor signing off for you, make sure you do this sooner rather than later.

  • Have all of your course registration codes in one spot. I write them in a list and just type them in furiously when it’s my time to register. I know some people have them typed in a Word doc and copy and paste them — whatever works best for you! This lets you find your classes sooner — and hopefully beating out other people fighting for your spot.

  • STAY CALM. I know I am an anxious wreck in the few minutes leading up to my registration time, but I try to remind myself that it’s not the end of the world if I don’t get into a class. There are always other options. So just remember to breathe and take your time!

Emily-intern-2105Written by Emily Mein. Emily attends St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y. Sharing information or a person’s story with people is why she loves writing. She can never get enough of Twitter, pasta and Syracuse basketball.

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Tuesday Tour Day — SUNY Potsdam

April 21st, 2015 by

potsdam-profile_13-14As one of the 64 State Universities of New York, SUNY Potsdam is one of only three SUNY schools dedicated to the arts. Located in northern New York, the school enrolls around 4,330 undergraduate and graduate students. Because it’s a liberal arts school, students have the ability to tailor their experience to fit their interests and career goals.

Academic Life
SUNY Potsdam offers more than 40 majors and 40 minors. Potsdam students have the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree and then continue on to receive their master’s degrees. Art majors include music performance, music theory and dance performance, and Potsdam also offers more traditional majors like business, education and biology. As a Potsdam student, you can also cross-register at other area colleges to take courses Potsdam doesn’t offer. The school has an extensive study abroad program and many different internship opportunities.

Campus Life
SUNY Potsdam guarantees housing for all undergraduates on its 240-acre campus. Dorm life is comfortable and convenient to get to your classes, the library and even the gym. State-of-the-art facilities include The Crane Music Center filled with music and dance performance halls and the Maxcy Hall Athletic Complex. A brand new Performing Arts Village opened in spring 2014 for students. As for getting involved on campus, SUNY Potsdam offers around 80 different clubs and organizations including an a capella group, a student-run record label and a group devoted to helping the community with lessons learned from Harry Potter. Students can also get involved by participating in Greek life. Lastly, there are 16 varsity NCAA sports that compete in the SUNYAC at the Division II level.

Financial Aid
Over 85 percent of SUNY Potsdam students receive some sort of financial aid. With a staff willing to assist, families can develop financial plans to help them better afford college. For in-state students, tuition is $5,270, while out-of-state tuition is $14,320. Room and board for each is $9,830.

 To learn more about SUNY Potsdam and to request information, check out their college profile on NextStepU.com

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Major Monday — Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL)

April 20th, 2015 by

TeachingThe world we live in is becoming more diverse. Now more than ever before, the United States filled with people who don’t speak English. For those who don’t use English as their first language, living in this country can be very difficult. Teachers who teach English as a second language are responsible for helping their students get through the day and become more successful as an English-speaking citizen. If you want to make a direct, positive impact on someone’s life and enjoy learning about different people and their cultures, teaching ESL could be for you. These types of teachers are in demand around the country and around the world.

Education
To become an ESL teacher, it helps if you’re fascinated by language and communication. This major is mostly earned at a graduate level, and an undergraduate degree in education will best help prepare you to complete your master’s in ESL. You’ll take courses such are intercultural communication, methods of teaching ESL, structure of English, applied linguistics and issues in school for bilingual learners.  Knowing another language prior to college would help, but if you don’t, expect to learn one in school. You’ll spend a lot of time in schools observing and student teaching. Volunteering as a tutor for English language learners will give you experience that will help you in your career. Helpful high school courses include world history, U.S. history, a foreign language, psychology and English.

Questions to ask
Like most education degrees, it’s important to make sure the program you’re in is accredited. In this case, accreditation must be from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. Additionally, is the program approved by the state’s department of education? If you want to go right into teaching, ask if the program focuses more on practice or theory — you’ll want practice. Will the program help you find work after graduation?

Salary
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an adult basic and secondary education and literacy teacher who teaches ESL makes an average of $52,830.

Learn more about degrees in education by taking a Careers-In course at NextStepAcademy.com 

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Brighten Your Spring Giveaways — Studio C

April 17th, 2015 by

StudioC-blog

NextStepU loves to share products and companies with you that we think are simply amazing. After all, we know you need gear for college and if you are working, sometimes you want to splurge that hard-earned salary on something fun.

We also know cash is tight, so we love to give things away! For the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing with you products we think you’ll love that are sure to BRIGHTEN YOUR DAY!

Today we share with you a whole lot of BRIGHT goodies from our friends at Studio C. Nine lucky readers will get something from Studio C.

The Hot to Trot Rolling Duffel Bag helps you to travel in style! This stylish luggage from the Hot to Trot collection offers the convenience of a duffel and the ease of a rolling bag. Take it with you for a weekend vacation or on your next business trip. This bag pairs timeless sophistication with quality that will not disappoint!

Don’t forget the Hot to Trot Micro Tote! What’s black and white and hot all over? The Studio C Hot to Trot Collection! Stylishly protect your tablet and tote your valuables with this collection that’s sleek, sophisticated and playful all at the same time.

The Kaleidoscope Laptop Sleeve is black, bright and juicy all over! Stylishly carry and protect your laptop with this colorful 16″ case from the Studio C Kaleidoscope collection.

Stay organized in style with Studio C planners for the 2015-2016 academic year. These colorful planners are filled with inspirational tabs to keep you motivated all year long. (Planners pictured above do not represent actual size. Visit Studio C online for size and details for the planners.)

There will be one lucky winner for the bag, one winner for the tote, and another winner for the sleeve. Six winners will each receive a planner. All you have to do to be entered into the drawing is fill out the Rafflecopter app below.  You receive an entry for each item you complete.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

No purchase necessary. Enter the Brighten Your Spring: Studio C Giveaway before 11:59 p.m. (ET) on 4/23/15. Nine winners will be chosen shortly afterward and announced the week of 4/27/15. Each winner must respond to the email he or she receives in order to claim his or her prize. Any prize winner not responding by 5/27/15 will forfeit his/her prize. Entries will only be accepted through the Rafflecopter application and before the deadline date. 

Best of luck to everyone who enters!

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Scholarships — The Shawn Carter Scholarship Fund (SCSF)

April 16th, 2015 by

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NextStepU is happy to help guide you toward scholarships and opportunities to earn money for college. Here is a new scholarship we found for you!

Scholarship: The Shawn Carter Scholarship Fund (SCSF)

Amount: Varies

Description: The SCSF provides individual grants, paid directly to the educational institution, to every student who qualifies and reapplies yearly, from admission to graduation. The grant can be used to cover tuition expenses and related supplemental educational expenses such as books, lab fees, travel and select costs of living. All Shawn Carter Scholars are required to “give back” by conducting community service and by serving as mentors to younger, aspiring Shawn Carter Scholars.

Requirements:
• High school seniors, students with GED diplomas, undergraduate (2 year or 4 year) college students, and students at vocational or trade schools
• U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident
• 25 years old or younger
• Minimum 2.0 GPA

Deadline:  April 30th (11:59 PM EST)

For more information:  Visit the The Shawn Carter Scholarship Fund (SCSF) website.

Best of luck to those who apply!

> Want to continue your search? Take a look at NextStepU’s database of more than 2 million scholarships after you register at NextStepU.com.

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No car? No problem

April 15th, 2015 by

Woman and BagWhen looking for a college, most high school students are always interested in knowing if they can have a car or not freshman year. Well for me, that wasn’t a problem. I’m wrapping up my junior year in college and I still don’t have a car…or my license.

I know, I know — it sounds crazy. But driving just makes me an anxious person and I hate it. I understand I’m going to have to take my road test one day, but I just can’t get myself to do it quite yet. (Maybe I’ll get it this summer though. If I write it down and you all read it, I’ll feel the need to make it happen, right?)

But not having a car in college isn’t all bad. I’ve learned to make it work. And there’s actually some positives! You don’t have to worry about paying for gas, filling your gas tank in the cold, paying for a parking permit, walking to your car or clearing the snow off your car and digging it out (Although I suggest helping with the snow clearing if you’re relying on someone else).

I’ve never been the type of person who has to go somewhere unless it’s an extreme circumstance, so not being able to get off campus doesn’t really bother me. However, if you are a person who is constantly on-the-go but don’t have access to your own car, there are options!

Make friends with people with cars!
Most of my friends have cars on campus, so we normally have a weekly grocery trip. I stock up on everything I need then and make sure to plan out my list if I know a trip is coming soon. I know most schools don’t allow freshmen to have cars, but there likely is an upperclassmen or even a professor you can get to know who does. I know it’s awkward to ask, but if you really need something, you have to do it.

Your campus probably offers its own transportation services.
Most schools know it’s hard to get off campus sometimes and give you options to make it easier for you. At St. John Fisher, there’s a shuttle that runs numerous times a week to places like the local mall or Wegmans (our local grocery store). Take advantage of this and plan your trips around the schedule. Riding with other people in the same boat as you will give you something to talk about. You might just make some new friends this way!

There’s always public transportation.
Most colleges offer a discount on the local transit systems. It may seem scary and overwhelming at first because of the different lines and schedules, but you’ll become a pro soon enough. Talk to someone in your campus center or security about how to use the public transportation.

The biggest issue can come when you are required to go off-campus. The only time I’ve run into trouble is when it comes to internships. When I was planning my internship for this semester, I wanted one so bad, but not having a license really messed things up. I knew I either had to rely on public transportation or someone else. I was extremely stressed. It ended up working out though, as I arranged to get rides from my adviser.

Similarly, many classes at Fisher (and likely at other schools too) have field trips or require you to be off-campus instead of in the classroom. If you aren’t able to drive to these events, it can be difficult to find a way to get there. Carpooling can often be the best option but if you aren’t driving, make sure you pitch in for gas!

So, my overall advice for you when it comes to not having a car is to just learn to manage. I’ve been in moods where I just want to get off campus, but that’s when I call my mom or my boyfriend and say, “Hey, come visit!” Or you can plan a “staycation” and turn off your lights, forget about homework and just watch some Netflix. But if you absolutely need to get off campus for something, just remember there are a lot of options at your disposal, you just have to know about them and use them!

Emily-intern-2105Written by Emily Mein. Emily attends St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y. Sharing information or a person’s story with people is why she loves writing. She can never get enough of Twitter, pasta and Syracuse basketball.

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Tuesday Tour Day — Johnson & Wales University Graduate Studies (Providence, RI)

April 14th, 2015 by

jwu-gradIt’s never too early to start considering your options for graduate school. As your undergraduate career comes to an end, you’ll be stressed, especially if you haven’t begun to figure out your graduate school options. By figuring out your top choices early, you’ll save yourself a little stress.

Johnson & Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island offers a unique model of education that helps students advance their careers with graduate school. JWU has been chosen by students from 120 countries to further their careers. It has been ranked among the best colleges and universities in the U.S. by Forbes Magazine and U.S. News & World Report.

What’s offered
JWU-Providence offers five MBA programs — a general option, a general one-year program, a program concentrating in accounting, another concentrating in hospitality and lastly, concentrating in information technology. There are four MS programs — counseling, finance, human resource management and physician assistant studies. JWU offers a MAT in Culinary Arts Education and a MED in Teaching and Learning. There are also EDD programs in higher education and elementary/secondary education.

JWU’s programs are designed with input from leading companies and courses are taught by working professionals to ensure students know what it takes to succeed. There are small class sizes, so you get the attention you deserve. Some of the programs are accelerated, so you can earn your degree in just 12-18 months. There are night and weekend classes for working professionals.

Application
In order to apply, applicants must complete an application, provide proof of an earned bachelor’s degree, submit all college transcripts, provide two letters of recommendation and submit a statement of purpose essay. The GMAT/GRE is only required for some of the programs. If necessary, scores of 450 or higher are required.

When reviewing applicants, JWU looks for a strong academic records, your recommendations and work experience.

Financial aid
Those students who are qualified can apply for merit-based scholarships. JWU encourages its applicants to fill out the FAFSA in order to get financial aid. In MBA and MS programs, a 4.5 credit course is $1,858. In doctoral programs, the annual fee is $4,464.

> To learn more about Johnson & Wales University and to request information, check out their featured college profile at NextStepU.com.

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Major Monday — Exercise Science

April 13th, 2015 by

sportsAs you’re reading this, you’re probably scrolling through on your computer or phone. Chances are that you’re not thinking about your hand movements to make this happen — at least until now. Whether it’s scrolling through an article or running a marathon, the human body allows us to do a lot. If this interests you, a major in exercise science may be for you. You’ll study the science of human movement and learn how to help people live healthier lives through exercise, rehabilitation and nutrition.

Education
An exercise science program is most often offered as a bachelor’s degree. It helps to be interested in math, science and health, while having an interest in exercising and taking care of your body. An exercise science major learns everything about the human body including nutrition, conditioning, injury, illness and how diet can affect a body’s performance. You’ll take courses in physical education, exercise physiology, motor development, biomechanics, fitness assessment and exercise prescription, statistics and sports management and nutrition. Helpful high school classes include health, biology, chemistry, statistics, psychology and physics.

Questions to ask
When looking at different programs, make sure you find out how many professors are in the department. It’s important to make sure you’ll get enough attention. Can you choose a concentration like sports management, athletic training for kinesiology? You can only learn so much about exercise science in a classroom or lab — will the department help you find an internship? What graduate programs or careers have recent grads chosen?

Salary
According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an exercise physiologist made an average of $42,690 a year.

> For more career and major information, visit NextStepU.com.

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