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Major Monday — Tourism and Travel

March 30th, 2015 by

Female Executive With Files Attending Phone CallAre you outgoing? Do you like learning about various cultures and people? If you like helping others and making plans, a travel and tourism management major might be for you. Whether it’s a trip for business or pleasure, you’ll make it as easy as possible for your customer.

Education
A travel and tourism management program most likely leads to an associate degree. In order to get firsthand experience, it’s recommended that students in this program do some traveling, especially studying abroad. You’ll take courses in travel agency management, business presentations, hospitality law, marketing management, destinations and cultures, computer-based information systems, sales and reservations and ticketing. There’s a chance that your most important learning will take place in a real-life situation like an internship in a travel agency. In high school, it helps to take classes like accounting, psychology, geography, computer applications and business.

Questions to ask
In this type of industry, it’s important to get an up-to-date education — are the professors actively involved in the travel and tourism industry? The classroom education can only go so far — what hands-on learning opportunities does the program provide? Ask if the program will help you find work after graduation and inquire about what recent grads are doing now.

Salary
A major in travel and tourism management can allow you to start off as a travel agent, making an average of $34,600 a year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. But you can use your degree to work your way up to management, where you’ll see an increase in pay. Another option with this degree is a meeting, convention and event planner, which made an average of $45,810 in 2012.

> For more information about careers, majors and more, visit NextStepU.com!

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Dressing Appropriately on Campus

March 25th, 2015 by

iStock_000016826623SmallThe unthinkable has finally started to happen — the cold is making its way out and in it’s place are warmer temperatures and a strong case of spring fever. Now is the time of year where students and faculty make it out of their winter lairs and into the fresh air. With so much exposure, though, it’s hard to remember what was appropriate to wear on campus when you weren’t bundled up in 15 different layers. Try this guide to jump-start your spring wardrobe without causing too many double-takes:

In the dining hall
Meals give you a break from the never-ending classes, assignments, meetings or jobs. It’s a chance to sit back, relax, eat some food and catch up with friends. During the week, you’re probably running to the dining hall in between classes or meetings. You already got ready that morning, so no prep is necessary. You’ll probably always see a lot of students wearing your college’s gear and it’s not uncommon to see numerous people wearing the same thing. The dining hall is the go-between for many students so wear what’s comfortable to you — whether you’re coming from that prestigious internship, or from bed.

Going to the gym
Pop quiz: Is it acceptable to go places on campus after putting in time at the gym? Answer: Yes — within reason. With a quick trip to the dining hall or a stop at the library to print an essay, you don’t have to worry about people judging you; they’ll understand you’re trying to better yourself and you might just serve as inspiration for someone who’s been making excuses. We’ve all done it before, so go ahead and rock your sweaty gym clothes. BUT there are important exceptions: Anything that involves meeting with someone that is a superior (I.e. an advisor, someone in career services, financial aid, etc.), you know better than to try to wear a sweaty pair of shorts. Go back to your dorm to shower before attempting any sort of impression.

Study group
Being respectful of your peers is a no-brainer but for those who show up on a day you don’t have class, please don’t tempt all of us with your slippers. I understand it’s your day off and you’ve probably just watched Netflix all day, but can’t you see we all want to be in your shoes…well, slippers? It’s just a tease. And, your laid-back attitude isn’t really great for the work we’re trying to get done — minimal effort would be ideal!

The moral?
While there are certain dress standards on campus, the best advice I can give you is to use your judgement and just be yourself!

Emily-intern-2105Written by Emily Mein. Emily attends St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y. Sharing information or a person’s story with people is why she loves writing. She can never get enough of Twitter, pasta and Syracuse basketball.

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Tuesday Tour Day — Trinity Washington University

March 24th, 2015 by

twuTrinity Washington University is located in the nation’s capital, just minutes from the U.S. Capitol and downtown Washington, DC. Founded in 1897, it is one of the first Catholic colleges for women in the US. Since then, Trinity has remained faithful to its primary vision with a mission to ensure access to a high quality education for women who might otherwise be excluded. The majority of students enrolled are women, but there are men attending Trinity.

Academics
At Trinity, there are 20 baccalaureate majors including business administration, registered nursing and education. Since Trinity focuses on women, men are only able to attend the university in programs in the School of Professional Services and at the graduate level. All classes are taught by faculty and every tenured faculty member has the highest degree possible in their field. The average class size at Trinity is 15.

Campus Life
There are on-campus activities that take place every day, involving all members of the school, including athletic events, public lectures, clubs and organization and Trinity Traditions. Trinity urges its students to have an active life outside of the classroom. Most students explore the cultural, historical and community events that the DC-area offers. Since health and fitness are important parts of an education, Trinity is a member of Division III athletics. There are varsity level sports as well as intramurals.

Financial Aid
Over $1 million in aid is awarded by Trinity each year in addition to state and federal funding. The school offers need-based and merit-based aid in amounts ranging from $1,000 to $12,000. Tuition is $20,150 and room and board is $9,210.

Learn more about Trinity Washington and request information directly from NextStepU.com!

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Major Monday — Human Resources

March 23rd, 2015 by

iStock_000004692694SmallEmployee relations is an essential part of any business in order to ensure a healthy and safe work environment. The human resources department is essential to keeping those relations going smoothly and is responsible for hiring, keeping employee-employer relationship positive and even firing those employees who do not meet the standards of the business. If you genuinely enjoy working with other people and have strong communication skills, you might want to consider pursuing a human resources major.

Education
A human resources degree is most often earned at the bachelor’s level. In this major, you’ll study people and the workplace to make sure that the needs of people in the workplace are met. The courses you’ll take in this major include staffing, organizational behavior, employee and labor relations, compensation and benefits, legal issues and performance management. In high school, it helps to take courses like calculus, statistics, economics, English, psychology and computer applications.

Questions to ask
It’s important that you get the attention you deserve at the school you decide on — how many professors are in the department? Does the program have a positive reputation in the HR field? Experience is necessary with this major – will the school help you find internships? Where have recent students interned? Will the school help you in your job search?

Salary
According to the 2012 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median pay for human resources specialists was $55,640 a year. After five or more years of experience, you can become a human resources manager and have the chance to make up to $99,720 a year.

Want to explore more careers? Visit NextStepU.com to get career info and advice on majors from all fields.

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Scholarships — Spokeo Connections Scholarship

March 19th, 2015 by

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NextStepU is happy to help guide you toward scholarships and opportunities to earn money for college. Here is a new scholarship we found for you!

Scholarship: Spokeo Connections Scholarship

Amount: $1,000

Description: Spokeo is committed to connecting you with educators and your future. Answer one of three prompts (connection, data or social) and submit it through the Spokeo website to apply.

Requirements:  Applicant must be either a recently graduated high school senior who will enroll as a freshman at a four
year or two year college or university in the fall of 2015 or a student currently enrolled on a full-time basis at an accredited four-year or two-year college or university. Applicant must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Applicant must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident of the United States. Essay must be no fewer than 1,000 words and no greater than 1,600 words. Essay must be applicant’s original work.

Deadline: July 1, 2015. Winner will be announced August 1, 2015.

For more information:  Visit the Spokeo scholarship website.

Best of luck to those who apply!

> Want to continue your search? Take a look at NextStepU’s database of more than 2 million scholarships after you register at NextStepU.com.

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Taking trips in college

March 18th, 2015 by

While I was home in snowy, cold Syracuse, New York during spring break, I was seeing pictures on social media of people in warm places in bathing suits, soaking in the sun. I also caught up on my best friend’s blog who is currently studying abroad in Australia, where it is currently summer and the coldest it’s been since she’s been there was 78 degrees.

It was pretty depressing, but what got me through the funk was realizing I’m going to New York City this week. Although it’s not Florida or Puerto Rico, it’s something. In Rochester, February broke the record for the coldest month ever, so 50-degree weather works for me!

When I came to school, I didn’t think I was going to go on many trips — I wasn’t on a sports team and going somewhere tropical isn’t in my budget. But I realized there were a lot of opportunities to still travel.

As part of my school’s newspaper, this is my second year going to NYC to take part in a three-day college media conference filled with sessions hosted by professionals and keynote speakers. The last session ends at 4 p.m., so we even get to have nights free!

Last year’s group who went on the NYC trip for our newspaper in Times Square.

Last year’s group who went on the NYC trip for our newspaper in Times Square.

DISCLAIMER: I’m lucky to be part of something that has travel worked into the budget. Our conference registration, hotel and travel is covered. All I have to pay for is food, souvenirs and things we do in our free time. But sometimes not all of these trips are free — you might have to shell out some money yourself for these kinds of excursions. Luckily, it’s usually a discounted cost compared to what it would be if you went on your own.

Many college clubs offer similar trips off-campus. Our sport management club hosts a trip every year to a different city to see different sport venues and games. The volunteering club I’m part of offers service trips to local places and even other countries.

Our Student Activities Board (SAB) hosts various trips a year to places like NYC or Boston. In order to go on these trips, you have to pay around $150, but it’s a good deal with hotel, travel and some things to do.

Also, taking certain classes allows you to go on trips. There’s a sport management class offered at my college sometimes where you learn about different countries and how they manage sports culminating in a trip over spring break to the countries. That’s a hefty amount to pay, but there are other options. Other classes, like communication or business courses, bring you to different cities or colleges for conferences; some even include awesome networking opportunities.

If you’re not sure about getting involved, the opportunity to go on trips should be an incentive! Taking these trips creates memories with friends, while giving you information and knowledge you wouldn’t get just on campus.

Emily-intern-2105Written by Emily Mein. Emily attends St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y. Sharing information or a person’s story with people is why she loves writing. She can never get enough of Twitter, pasta and Syracuse basketball.

 

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Tuesday Tour Day — Le Moyne College

March 17th, 2015 by

lemoyneLocated in suburban Syracuse, New York, upon a hill is Le Moyne College. The liberal arts school was founded in the Jesuit tradition and is the second youngest of America’s 28 Jesuit colleges and universities.

Academics
With 30 programs ranging from accounting to special education, Le Moyne offers students many undergraduate opportunities. Since it’s a liberal arts college, all students must complete a 12-course humanities-based core curriculum. The average class size is 20 students with a 13 to 1 student-to-faculty ratio.

Campus Life
Le Moyne offers over 80 clubs and organizations to become involved. On-campus housing has a variety of options including doubles, suites, townhouses and apartments and is guaranteed all four years. The campus has modern living accommodations and the latest in technological advances. The nearby streets of Syracuse are lined with eclectic shops and yummy restaurants. As for athletics, the Dolphins are in Division II and compete at a nationally premier level both in the classroom and on the field. There are 19 intercollegiate teams, intramural and club sports opportunities.

Financial Aid
Know as one of America’s “best buys” in high education according to numerous publications, Le Moyne gives students more than $18 million in financial aid including merit-based scholarships and need-based grants. More than 90 percent of students receive some sort of financial assistance — the average student aid package is $24,800. Tuition at Le Moyne is $30,350, while room and board costs $10,890.

> Learn more about Le Moyne College at NextStepU.com.

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Major Monday — Nursing

March 16th, 2015 by

Caring professionNurses are responsible for caring for numerous people a day. Training to be a nurse prepares you for a career in which there are many opportunities and a variety of career options. If you’re looking for a career that is rewarding, challenging and will never be the same thing every day, nursing may be the major for you.

Education
A Resident Nurse (RN) major is most often offered at the associate and bachelor’s level. You’ll most likely start college as a pre-nursing major taking prerequisite courses before being admitted to the nursing school. It’s a rigorous major, requiring many hours of studying. Be prepared to take courses such as health assessment, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, nutrition, pharmacology and psychology. In addition to written work, tests and projects, you’ll have lab sessions where you practice the skills you learn about — either on your classmates, mannequins or real patients in a hospital. Classes in high school to help prepare for a nursing major include AP Psychology, AP Chemistry, AP Biology, statistics, health science and English composition.

Questions to ask
Make sure you know what you’ll start the program as — can you apply directly to the program as a senior in high school or do you have to be a pre-nursing major and apply after a year or two? It’s important that the program is accredited. You want to make sure the school has a good program — ask how many graduates pass the NCLEX-RN exam. Also ask about what type of clinical training sites they use — are they local or on campus? As a nurse, you’ll have patients who don’t speak English — does the school have medical-related language courses?

Salary
RNs make up the largest sector of the healthcare field with 2.5 million jobs, so someone graduating with this major will not be short on opportunities. An RN in 2012 made an average of $65,470, or $31.48 per hour, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

> Still not sure if nursing is right for you? Learn more about this career path at NextStepAcademy.com.

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Scholarships — Unigo

March 12th, 2015 by

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NextStepU is happy to help guide you toward scholarships and opportunities to earn money for college. Here is a new scholarship we found for you!

Scholarship: Unigo Resist the IST: Defy Sterotypes scholarship

Amount: Two $10,000 scholarships will be awarded

Description: Register or log in to Unigo to get the scholarship application. In 200 words or less, tell us how you have defied stereotypes.

Requirements: Applicant must be 14 years of age or older at the time of application. Be a legal resident of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia. Be currently enrolled (or enroll no later than the fall of 2019) in an accredited post-secondary institution of higher education.

Deadline: March 31, 2015. Winners will be announced June 2015.

For more information:  Visit the Unigo website.

Best of luck to those who apply!

> Want to continue your search? Take a look at NextStepU’s database of more than 2 million scholarships after you register at NextStepU.com.

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Beating the mid-winter blues

March 11th, 2015 by

Think Spring!

Halfway through the spring semester, we all hit our breaking point.  Midterms are happening, so we’re stressed. Spring break is so close, but still just out of reach. We’re cooped up inside because of lower temperatures or tundra-like settings. Our hopes for warmer weather are swept away every year when Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow (How can there really be six more weeks of this?!).

What you may not know is part of the reason we start to feel down this time of year is because of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), though actual diagnosis can only be confirmed by a doctor. According to the Mayo Clinic, SAD symptoms start in the fall and last through the winter months, sapping your energy and leaving you feeling moody. This is caused by the reduced level of sunlight that causes your body’s internal clock to be disrupted and your serotonin and melatonin levels to become unbalanced.

While some people do have SAD, most people just have some of the symptoms without the official diagnosis. Mayo Clinic says that symptoms include irritability, tiredness, oversleeping, appetite changes and weight gain.

But I’m here to tell you that it will all be over shortly. Once the sun starts coming out and the temperatures start rising, you’ll be able to walk leisurely around campus and even open up your windows. You’ll start soaking in some vitamin D and all your worries will melt away like the snow.

In the meantime, here are some tips to keep yourself going until spring:

Stay healthy
By getting enough sleep, eating healthy and exercising, you can combat some of the negative feelings you get. Meditation and yoga can also help.

Manage your stress
Let’s be honest, as college students we’re always stressed. But stress can make seasonal depression worse, so try to limit it. Getting organized by planning out your days and creating to-do lists can help.

Treat yourself
Maybe you need a good meal or a night of Netflix. While you may not be able to afford the meal or afford taking time to binge watch a show, it could help. Take a little you time and remind yourself spring is around the corner.

Soak up the sun
If you’re lucky enough to go to school where it’s sunny, yet cold, or even if the sun is out for a few hours, sit by a window to let the rays hit you. If you’re brave, take a walk. The vitamin D will help boost your mood. However, don’t resort to a tanning bed. If you need some vitamin D in a cloudy environment, take a supplement or add more vitamin D-rich foods to your diet.

Talk to someone
If the winter is really getting you down and all else fails, take advantage of your school’s health and wellness services. There’s going to be someone there to talk to and they’ll help you get through the winter.

Emily-intern-2105Written by Emily Mein. Emily attends St. John Fisher College in Rochester, N.Y. Sharing information or a person’s story with people is why she loves writing. She can never get enough of Twitter, pasta and Syracuse basketball.

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