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Major Monday- Clinical laboratory science

March 12th, 2012 by

If you have an interest in science or medicine but don’t want to work directly with patients, you might want to consider majoring in clinical laboratory science! Students in this field learn to diagnose disease by investigating bodily fluids, such as blood samples. They are also trained to supervise complicated medical tests and to manage clinical labs.

Education
According to the College Board, some of the typical courses that students take within this major include anatomy and physiology, genetics, clinical chemistry and microbiology (the study of microscopic life forms). Many classes include a combination of lecture, discussion and lab work and students will often be required to use new lab equipment to compose lab reports. Students will often study both individually and within a group in order to prepare for the typical work environment that they will be working in after college.

What to know before applying
Students who wish to pursue a major in clinical laboratory science should be good at solving problems, detail oriented and learn best with hands-on activity. Students should make sure that the school they are applying to has a clinical program that is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences and should find out what kind of clinical studies and rotations they will be able to choose from.

Salary
After receiving a degree in clinical laboratory science, many students go on to become clinical lab technicians or technologists. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, professionals in clinical technology earn a median salary of $53,500. Careers in this field can vary from federal positions to medical laboratories. Clinical technicians earn a mean salary of $35,380 and work in colleges and universities as well as other healthcare service facilities.

A few schools that offer this degree:
UNC at Chapel Hill
The Ohio State University
St. Joseph’s College

Find colleges that offer healthcare training at NextStepU college match.

Laura the Intern
writer@nextstepu.com
facebook.com/nextstepmag
Message me on the Community Boards! (I’m InternLaura)

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Major Monday – Political Science

February 20th, 2012 by

In honor of President’s Day, we’re featuring our Major Monday on political science and careers in politics! Whether your aspirations are high (the Oval Office) or a little bit more local (mayor of your hometown), you should have the ability to motivate your voters and be prepared to have your actions affect the lives of many people.

Education

According to the College Board, students who major in political science will often write papers on current public affairs, study the history of political concepts and are expected to write a major research project for their senior thesis. Students will often also run for student government, join the political science club or campus political organization or take a seminar course in a specific subject like gender studies or international relations.

This could be you someday.

What you need to know before applying

Some important aspects to consider when applying for colleges with a political science major include looking for schools with related minors like economics or sociology, as well as figuring out what internships or other programs are available through the school. The best politicians tend to have experience, so getting a good internship or having the opportunity to get first-hand experience is essential. Also important to consider is whether or not the department, faculty or school has a particular political leaning and figuring out how it is compatible with your own views.

Salary

The current wages of politicians vary greatly based on what area you choose to run in. As of May 2008, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that legislators had yearly wages of about $37,980, while the President of the United States makes $400,000 a year. As of 2007, state governors’ salaries ranged from $70,000 (Maine) to $206,500 (California); while in 2009, U.S. Senators and Representatives made $174,000 per year. Competitiveness for political jobs vary based on the size of the area in which you are running with far more competition in large races than in small, local ones.

Until next time,

Laura the Intern
writer@nextstepu.com
facebook.com/nextstepmag
Message me on the Community Boards! (I’m InternLaura)

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